Archive for November 29th, 2008

A Different Tack: Winter in Japan

Golden Pavilion, Kyoto. Photo by oudodou.

Golden Pavilion, Kyoto. Photo by oudodou.

SEOUL — IT ALL STARTED WITH a warning about leech socks. My wife and I were beginning to plan a long-overdue honeymoon and were taken by the notion of going someplace less conventional. So when I hit upon the idea of going to Borneo, we got excited. I bought a Lonely Planet and a Malay phrasebook, and eagerly skimmed through passages describing Sarawak’s primate-inhabited jungles, dreaming of riverboat rides to Iban villages as I rode the train to work.

Then I passed LP off to Janice, who — being a much more methodical person than myself — started reading from the beginning. Only a few minutes had passed before she brought the aforementioned warning to my attention, raising a skeptical eyebrow as to whether our honeymoon should involve insidious crawlies used to bleed people in the middle ages.¬† Leech socks (actually thigh-length leg guards made of durable fabric) were highly recommended when trekking around any of Borneo’s mystifying national parks, our guidebook told us.¬† And with a few more Google searches on the likelihood of getting vampired, my wife was recommending we go somewhere else.

A trip to Bangkok and Koh Samui was our next idea. A heavy shift towards the typical honeymoon, perhaps, but it would still bring us to a part of the world we had never seen. We did extensive research, feeling the pressure build for “the perfect trip” and then watching our options dissolve as it became clear we would be arriving in the eye of the 30-day peak tourism season. Hotel rates, even for those with “meh” reviews, were ludicrously high. Flight availability was also drying up. It began to appear as though we would be draining our savings for a vacation that would ultimately feel like work.

We dumped the plans and went back to the drawing board. And reading the news this past week, we’re glad we did.

Meiji lantern. Photo by Abrilon.

Meiji lantern. Photo by Abrilon.

Japan should have come to mind sooner, but our pursuit of a warm beach had kept the idea outside the realm of our travel imagination. Only after I gave some thought to the ease of heading somewhere so nearby — if we took the ferry to Fukuoka, we wouldn’t even have to step foot on an airplane — did it become clear that this was the trip we had been seeking. With barely a month left before my wife’s vacation time, we kicked planning into high gear.

Making arrangements was not as simple as I had envisioned. With the autmn leaves mulch on the ground and cherry blossom season a long ways off, I figured booking a room in a traditional Kyoto guesthouse  for five nights would be a cinch. I had, of course, failed to take into account the hubbub New Years might bring to the ancient capital. But Janice and I manuevered around this mostly without panic, locking in three nights at a mid-range ryokan and then opting to head towards Osaka to ring in 2009.

The process has brought home a couple of travel truisms: planning is half the battle, and “the perfect trip” is most elusive when sought after. Also, keep your eyes open to destinations in off-peak seasons. (The New York Times did a great piece about Prague last Februrary.)

We’re extremely excited about our upcoming jaunt, and we’d be lying if we said we didn’t have any expectations. But we are also, ideally, determined to just roll with how it unfolds, in the mode of the planning process itself. It’s a state of mind we hope to retain, for use when we finally decide to trek through the wild of Borneo — donning a pair of leech socks.


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